Infective Organisms and their Changing Antibiotic Sensitivity Trends in Infections Occurring in Orthopaedics Implant Surgery

  • Hidayat Ullah Department of Orthopaedics, Khyber teaching hospital, Peshawar
  • Muhammad Siraj Department Orthopedic Khyber Teaching Hospital Peshawar
  • Abid Ali Department Orthopedic Khyber Teaching Hospital Peshawar
  • M. Afrasiyab Javed Khan Department Orthopedic Khyber Teaching Hospital Peshawar
  • Muhammad Shoaib Khan Department of Orthopaedics, Khyber teaching hospital, Peshawar
  • Zahid Askar Department Orthopedic Khyber Teaching Hospital Peshawar

Abstract

Objective: To know about the various pathogens causing infection in Orthopaedic implant surgeries and their antibiotic sensitivities.


Methods: This prospective study was conducted in Department of Orthopaedics, Khyber teaching Hospital, Peshawar, from January 2015 to December 2015. All patients having close fractures of long bones including humerus, radius/ulna, femur and tibia requiring open reduction and internal fixation ORIF were included. Patients data was noted on a preformed proforma. Patients were followed up to 6 months.


Results: 30 patients out of 650 developed Surgical site infection were selected. 23 were male and 7 were female patients. Age range was from 5-75 years. Staph Aureus including Methicillin resistant Staph Aureus MRSA was most common cultured organism, followed by E Coli and pseudomonas. 23 cases yielded single organism, 5 cases yielded 2 organisms, 1 case yielded 3 organisms. There was no organism growth in one case.


Conclusion: Staph aureus including MRSA is the main cause of surgical site infection in orthopedics implant surgery. Other bacteria like E. Coli may cause surgical site infection. Antibiotics should be prescribed according to culture and sensitivity reports.

Author Biographies

Muhammad Shoaib Khan, Department of Orthopaedics, Khyber teaching hospital, Peshawar

Associate Professor

Zahid Askar, Department Orthopedic Khyber Teaching Hospital Peshawar

Professor

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Published
2018-04-09
How to Cite
ULLAH, Hidayat et al. Infective Organisms and their Changing Antibiotic Sensitivity Trends in Infections Occurring in Orthopaedics Implant Surgery. Journal of Pakistan Orthopaedic Association, [S.l.], v. 30, n. 01, p. 01-03, apr. 2018. ISSN 2076-8966. Available at: <http://www.jpoa.org.pk/index.php/upload/article/view/181>. Date accessed: 25 apr. 2018.